Today, things were really hotting up. Literally. After yesterday’s downpours, the sun was fighting it’s way through the rising fog over the Kitzbüheler Horn during our morning run, which produced some spectacular sights.

image

I like the run course. It’s undulating with 2 rises, nothing impossible, though I may change my mind after 40k of cycling.

The paratriathletes were off early, so we stayed for a bit of cheering. I always find their performances amazing and consider myself very fortunate to train with some of the best.

image

At this stage, I realised,  I’d forgotten my race license and had no cash. Back home then, then cruise to registration. Finally, I took possession of the coolest athlete gift so far: the already legendary green Kitzbühel bobble hat. It’s summer, but hey, it’s rather nippy in the morning.

Off to the race briefing. They are an affair of pleasure and pain. Pain because some of the questions asked at the briefings makes you question people’s common sense. Pleasure, because you finally get to meet all the other Team GB athletes. We comfortably filled up the conference room and thankfully the team manager stopped questions after the first ridiculous question. Hooray!

image

Finally, it was time for the Ali Brownlee show, or how the announcer liked to say BrownLEEEE. The sun was boiling down, my mum had got us places on the main stand with perfect view of the big screen (Nice work Mom!). It was an impressive, if expected result. They were dillydallying on the bike and it was obvious when the pack joined, it would be a run race with the inevitable result. The battle for the other medals was way more exciting.

image

Then it was racking time. The whole course is simply spectacular and scenic a nd transition is no different. I am always nervous, leaving my bike over night in transition. This may sound totally silly, but I fear she will be angry with me in the morning.

image

Back home, bag packed. Time for reflection on the race. I’m going into this race with a few things I want to do for myself. I have no expectation of a medal. If I execute what I want to do, I will be happy. If that gets me to 16th place, great. If it wins me a medal, great. Last year I put a lot of pressure on myself about having to medal. When I came 4th, I was bummed out beyond belief and it took my motivation away, even though I still had the Worlds in London. So, I’ve decided the medal game is secondary.

Late in the evening, the midsummer fires were lit throughout the valley. It was the longest day. Amazing.

Advertisements